World Health Organization reconfirms KU research group as collaborating center

Tue, 04/16/2013

Contact

Karen Henry
Life Span Institute
785-864-0756

LAWRENCE — The University of Kansas’ Work Group for Community Health and Development has been redesignated as an official World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Community Health and Development for another four years.

Stephen Fawcett, Kansas Health Foundation Distinguished Professor, and Jerry Schultz, associate director of the KU Work Group on Community Health and Development, will continue to direct the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Community Health and Development at KU.

“We are honored to continue in this extraordinary network of centers working to assure conditions for health and human development,” said Fawcett. “As a WHO Collaborating Centre, we have opportunities to learn and contribute with those who are working for health equity around the world.”

WHO originally selected the KU Work Group to be a collaborating center in 2004, joining a small group of centers with a similar mission in the Americas, including those at the University of Toronto, University of São Paulo and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A WHO collaborating center is designated by the WHO Director-General to be part of an international collaborative network to carry out activities in support of WHO’s mandate for promoting international health.

The KU Work Group will continue to work closely with the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), one of WHO’s six regional offices. The primary objectives of the KU Collaborating Center are to expand the evidence base for health promotion efforts and to build capacity for community health and development globally using the resources of the KU Work Group’s online Community Tool Box (CTB).

The Community Tool Box is a free, public web site that distills decades of the Work Group’s research and practice to take groups – from grass-roots to government - through planning, implementation and evaluation of community health and development initiatives. The site houses more than 7,000 pages of resources that are used by more than 2.3 million users in 224 countries. Those resources include learning modules and training resources for building skills in community assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation, advocacy and sustainability.

In collaboration with PAHO, the CTB is now available in Spanish to help build capacity in the Americas. Site users can access in-depth support for developing a strategic or evaluation plan and can read case examples of culturally grounded work on issues such as promoting maternal and child health, nutrition, physical activity, and sanitation and water quality.

The Center is located at 4081 Dole Human Development Center on the KU Lawrence campus.



KU professor’s research finds link between depression and increased risk of death among U.S. adults 50 and older. Find out why: http://bit.ly/VjkCVh Tags: University of Kansas Medical Center #KUdiscoveries #KUresearch #Depression
#KUprof finds link between depression and increased risk of death in US adults 50 and older. http://t.co/FYTMXQcpXK #KUdiscoveries
KU student tricks monkey flower into growing protective ‘hair’ Thanks to a KU Undergraduate Research Award (see more at http://ugresearch.ku.edu/student/fund/ugra), Sukhindervir Sandhu, a KU junior in biochemistry, figured out which genetic button to push to get a monkey flower, or Mimulus guttatus, to grow protective trichomes, or plant hair. Sandhu was able to track it down to a gene called SKP-1. By silencing SKP-1, he discovered that gene regulates plant hair growth in monkey flowers.


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
1 of 9 public universities with outstanding study abroad programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
$260.5 million in externally funded research expenditures
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times