Late KUMC dean, husband leave $10M estate gift for scholarships, libraries

Thu, 07/18/2013

Contact

KU Endowment
785-832-7398

LAWRENCE — A $10 million estate gift from Stata Norton Ringle and David Ringle will create scholarships for students in the University of Kansas Medical Center’s School of Health Professions and provide support for libraries at the medical center and on KU’s Lawrence campus.

The gift will be divided equally for these three purposes: student scholarships, the Clendening History of Medicine Library and the Kenneth Spencer Research Library. This more than doubles the amount of scholarship support available for students in the School of Health Professions. The library gifts will support acquisition of books and manuscripts, and maintenance of existing collections.

“Stata Norton Ringle was a pioneer in her field and a role model for generations of students at the medical center,” said Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little. “She and David were devoted to each other and to their scientific endeavors. Through this generous gift, they have left an enduring legacy that will benefit KU students and help the university educate the health professionals Kansas communities need.”

Stata Norton Ringle served in various capacities at the medical center from 1962 until 1990. She was emerita professor of pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutics; professor in the Department of Dietetics and Nutrition; and dean of the School of Allied Health (now the School of Health Professions). She wrote more than 150 research articles and was internationally recognized for her work on the effects of drugs and toxins on animal behavior.

David Ringle was a research physiologist at the Midwest Research Institute until his retirement. He was awarded the prestigious New York University Founders Day Award. Former residents of Leawood, the Ringles were married for more than 62 years and died within three months of each other in 2012.

Stata co-wrote a book titled "Herbal Supplements and the Brain: Understanding Their Health Benefits and Hazards," which was published shortly before her death. Her co-author was S.J. Enna, KUMC associate dean for research and graduate education.

Enna also is a professor of pharmacology and physiology and former chair of the Department of Pharmacology. He and the Ringles were friends for more than 20 years. Enna described them as a delightful couple who enjoyed spending weekends with their dogs at a modest second home they owned in the country. The couple had no children, and Stata was devoted to her career.

“KU obviously meant a lot to Stata, and if it meant a lot to Stata, it meant a lot to David,” said Enna.

Enna described Stata as energetic. “Up to the end, she was very interested in life and staying active, especially intellectually active. She was always curious, always reading something.”

When Stata was in her early 80s, she decided to translate a 400-page manuscript at the Kenneth Spencer Research Library. "The Jesuatti Book of Remedies" is a compilation of medical treatments used by the friars of the Order of Saint Jerome to cure sick people around the 16th century. She first taught herself Renaissance Italian, then spent four years translating more than 2,000 entries.

“This really epitomizes Stata,” said Enna. “She didn’t speak or read Italian. But she didn’t let anything like that stop her.”

In addition to their monetary estate gift, the Ringles donated their collection of medical and scientific books to the Clendening History of Medicine Library. Other books, including works of historical and literary interest, went to the Kenneth Spencer Research Library. During their lifetimes, the couple gave nearly $250,000 to KU Endowment for KU, with the bulk of their support equally divided among the School of Health Professions and the two libraries.

Stata was named an honorary alumna of the School of Health Professions in 1998. For the past 28 years, the school has honored her by presenting the annual Stata Norton Distinguished Teaching Award to deserving professors.

The gift counts toward Far Above: The Campaign for Kansas, the university’s $1.2 billion comprehensive fundraising campaign. Far Above seeks support to educate future leaders, advance medicine, accelerate discovery and drive economic growth to seize the opportunities of the future.

The campaign is managed by KU Endowment, the independent, nonprofit organization serving as the official fundraising and fund-management organization for KU. Founded in 1891, KU Endowment was the first foundation of its kind at a U.S. public university.



Can a new species of frog have a doppelgänger? KU researchers say yes. Learn more about the discovery here: http://bit.ly/XHT3H3 Tags: #KUdiscoveries #KUresearch #KUstudents #Frog #LookAlike

Rrrroar! #KUresearch proved the Tyrannosaurus rex was a predator. http://t.co/8V5XazL0FI #KUfacts #KUdiscoveries #dinosaurs
Poet offers insights to Jayhawk experience through wordplay "Welcome to KU. Where questions rest, in stacks of answers from the past. …" Listen to Topher Enneking, a spoken word poet and former KU football player, as he weaves the experience of KU and its traditions through this storytelling and wordplay performance. Learn more about KU traditions at http://www.ku.edu/about/traditions/. Welcome to KU. Where questions rest in stacks of answers from the past. Where dreams crawl out of bed And learn to walk Uphill both ways. Where freshmen stand on stilts And hang from the rafters, While the wheat waves In a fieldhouse Where the Phog rolls in Helping us to see Through the past into the future. Haunting hosts giving handouts in a heritage Too heavy to grasp til you add to it. So it may be born anew, Allowing our boots to stand in the ash of oppression’s hate But shine bright as the sun While war cries of warriors past Ring in our ears long after their battles are won. Memorials telling time, “you don’t have to stand still.” Because the top of the world Is just up that Hill. Where our natural history is an awe-struck echo Of world’s fair and equal Past, present and future, prelude and sequel. Where our flags fly above planes. Where we build in chalks that can’t be erased. Stone edifices made to last So you would walk Past their doors, down their halls And let your voice fill their room. Because only in empty silence can destruction loom. So stand tall. Wrap your arms around this crowd Sing our alma mater and sing it out loud. Let your voice sing in chorus and reach other nations Beckoning new Jayhawks to spark new collaborations Because you are the mortar that will hold these walls upright. Your future Your dreams are why Jayhawks did fight For the tradition before you Was merely prelude For what will come next now that you’re at KU.


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
1 of 9 public universities with outstanding study abroad programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
$260.5 million in externally funded research expenditures
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times