Panel scheduled today on civil unrest in Ukraine

Thu, 02/06/2014

Contact

Bart Redford
Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies
785-864-4248

LAWRENCE — In recent months Ukraine has witnessed some of the largest political demonstrations in recent history. The University of Kansas Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies has planned a panel discussion to discuss those issues.

“What’s going on in Ukraine?” will start at 1 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 6, in Alderson Auditorium of the Kansas Union.

With thousands of its citizens rallying in support of the country’s further integration with the European Union, the Ukrainian government instead announced plans to join an economic union with the Russian Federation, then outlawed most forms of assembly and protest. Peaceful protests then turned into violent clashes between protesters and police. Now, after three months of protracted political standoff, a peaceful resolution seems remote.

For anyone unfamiliar with Ukraine and its geopolitical trajectory after declaring independence from the USSR, sparse U.S media coverage may be creating more questions than answers that panelists plan to answer.

CREES has invited James Marson, deputy bureau chief in Moscow for The Wall Street Journal & Dow Jones Newswires, to speak by Skype, describing media coverage of the protests in Kiev and across Ukraine. Following Marson, REES Alumna Amy Murphy will describe her own experiences as she recruited candidates in Ukraine for a high school exchange program in the fall of 2013. Finally, Ukrainian Studies Professor Alex Tsiovkh will speak on the EuroMaidan movement and its significance in Ukrainian history and politics.

CREES offers one of the leading programs in Ukrainian studies in the U.S. It includes all levels of Ukrainian language study, as well as courses in Ukrainian history, politics, and culture. The Palij Family Fund supports the annual visiting Palij Lecturer focusing on Ukrainian studies and provides the annual Ukrainian Studies Prize for an outstanding student specializing in Ukraine. The Jarosewycz Family Scholarship provides an annual award to students with strong interests in Ukrainian studies. KU also offers an intensive summer study abroad program focusing on Ukrainian language and culture in Lviv, Ukraine. 



KU in the news
Christian Science MonitorThu, 08/21/2014
Columbia Journalism ReviewThu, 08/21/2014
Yesterday we introduced you to KU professor Rolfe Mandel and the discoveries he and his students are making. Watch this video to learn more. Tags: #KUdiscoveries #KUresearch #Archeology #Plains

KU ODYSSEY team digs for clues to ancient Pleistocene people Searching for evidence of early people living on the plains in the late Pleistocene age, (see http://bit.ly/1li6uYX) Rolfe Mandel, a KU distinguished professor of anthropology, led an excavation in July 2014 in the “Coffey Site” along the Big Blue River bank in Pottawatomie County, Kansas. Mandel says artifacts from Pleistocene period sediments could provide more clues about the Clovis and pre-Clovis people, who were the founding inhabitants of the Americas.


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
1 of 9 public universities with outstanding study abroad programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
$260.5 million in externally funded research expenditures
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times