Artist to visit for 'Very Nervous System'

Fri, 04/25/2014

Contact

Emily Ryan
Biodiversity Institute
785-864-6293

LAWRENCE — Toronto-based installation artist David Rokeby will be in residence at The Commons from Monday, April 28, through Thursday, May 1, in conjunction with Data & Democracy, the programming theme for the year. Rokeby will install a portion of "Very Nervous System," which converts the gesture and motion of viewers into sound.

The public is invited to view and interact with the piece Tuesday, April 29, preceding the Artist Talk. During the week, Rokeby will give a formal talk about his work, lead a Coffee @ The Commons conversation, work with students and participate in a dialogue about cross-disciplinary research with faculty.

Rokeby has been making art for more than 30 years. He is most well-known for his interactive work that engages the human body directly and for his work that utilizes artificial perception systems. More information about his oeuvre can be found at his website.

Scheduled events:

Tuesday, April 29

  • 4 p.m.-5:30 p.m. Installation viewing for 'Very Nervous System'
  • 5:30 p.m. Artist Talk

Wednesday, April 30

  • 10 a.m. Coffee @ The Commons
  • 3 p.m. Faculty roundtable: How do research questions develop across disciplines?

All events associated with the residency are free. A full schedule of events can be found online.



KU in the news
Christian Science MonitorThu, 08/21/2014
Columbia Journalism ReviewThu, 08/21/2014
Yesterday we introduced you to KU professor Rolfe Mandel and the discoveries he and his students are making. Watch this video to learn more. Tags: #KUdiscoveries #KUresearch #Archeology #Plains

#KUgrad brings personal experience into study of nation's #fostercare system. http://t.co/UWpibWjg5A
KU ODYSSEY team digs for clues to ancient Pleistocene people Searching for evidence of early people living on the plains in the late Pleistocene age, (see http://bit.ly/1li6uYX) Rolfe Mandel, a KU distinguished professor of anthropology, led an excavation in July 2014 in the “Coffey Site” along the Big Blue River bank in Pottawatomie County, Kansas. Mandel says artifacts from Pleistocene period sediments could provide more clues about the Clovis and pre-Clovis people, who were the founding inhabitants of the Americas.


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
1 of 9 public universities with outstanding study abroad programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
$260.5 million in externally funded research expenditures
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times